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“Sir Nicholas Winton” – How good Deeds can never be hidden

Written by Arvind Tiwari

Sir Nicholas Winton, this blog is dedicated to a real Hero, who saved not 1 or 2 but approximately 669 children’s and gave the a life which they deserve to.

“It is about encouraging people to make difference and not waiting for someone to be done or waiting”

Humanity

In today’s world there is an argument “does belief makes us a better people or religious belief can also make us morally worse.

Too hard for people like me to answer this with very small brain but as per my opinion there is third thing which is “Belief with logic behind can make us better human”

Humanity a soothing word to listen or read, we love reading banners or treat a person donating to NGO as a good human but what is the difference between good or bad human?

I have no clue to it but recently I was blessed watching a video for Sir Nicholas Winton a true human in himself. For the half of the century nobody was even aware what he did for humanity and how courageous he was. It only when his wife Mrs Barbara had found a dairy which was having names and address of all the children who were rescued.

Reason for calling him as hero is not only he have rescued 669 children’s but have also arranged shelter for them and all this for no name or fame but only and only for Humans.

Who was Sir Nicholas Winton?

Nicholas Winton was born on 19 May 1909 and died on 1st July 2015 aged 106.
He was known for organizing the rescue of 669 children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia during the 9 months before war broke out in 1939. The story became known to the public in 1988 when it featured on That’s Life, a BBC TV program hosted by Esther Rantzen. In 2003 he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for Services to Humanity for this work.

In December 1938, Nicholas Winton, a 29-year-old London stockbroker, was about to leave for a skiing holiday in Switzerland, when he received a phone call from his friend Martin Blake asking him to cancel his holiday and immediately come to Prague for a most exciting project. When Winton arrived, he was asked to help in the camps, in which thousands of refugees were living in appalling conditions.

In October 1938, after the ill-fated Munich Agreement between Germany and the Western European powers, the Nazis annexed a large part of western Czechoslovakia, the Sudetenland. Winton was convinced that the German occupation of the rest of the country would soon follow. To him and many others, the outbreak of war seemed inevitable. The news of Kristallnacht, the bloody pogrom against German and Austrian Jews on the nights of November 9 and 10, 1938, had reached Prague. Winton decided to take steps.

In terms of his mission, Winton was not thinking in small numbers, but of thousands of children. He was ready to start a mass evacuation.

Winton set up his own rescue

Independently of Operation Kindertransport (see sidebar), Nicholas Winton set up his own rescue operation. At first, Winton’s office was a dining room table at his hotel in Wenceslas Square in Prague. Anxious parents, who gradually came to understand the danger they and their children were in, came to Winton and placed the future of their children into his hands. Soon, an office was set up on Vorsilska Street, under the charge of Trevor Chadwick. Thousands of parents heard about this unique endeavor and hundreds of them lined up in front of the new office, drawing the attention of the Gestapo. Winton’s office distributed questionnaires and registered the children. Winton appointed Trevor Chadwick and Bill Barazetti to look after the Prague end when he returned to England. Many further requests for help came from Slovakia, a region east of Prague.

Winton contacted the governments of nations he thought could take in the children. Only Sweden and his own government said yes. Great Britain promised to accept children under the age of 18 as long as he found homes and guarantors who could deposit £50 for each child to pay for their return home.

He wanted to save the lives of as many

Because he wanted to save the lives of as many of the endangered children as possible. Winton returned to London and planned the transport of children to Great Britain. He worked at his regular job on the Stock Exchange by day. Then devoted late afternoons and evenings to his rescue efforts, often working far into the night. He made up an organization, calling it “The British Committee for Refugees from Czechoslovakia, Children’s Section.” The committee consisted of himself, his mother, his secretary and a few volunteers.

Winton had to find funds to use for repatriation costs, and a foster home for each child. He also had to raise money to pay for the transports when the children’s parents could not cover the costs. Advertised in British newspapers, and in churches and synagogues. Printed groups of children’s photographs all over Britain. It felt certain that seeing the children’s photos would convince potential sponsors and foster families to offer assistance. Finding sponsors was only one of the endless problems in obtaining the necessary documents from German and British authorities.

First success March 14, 1939

On March 14, 1939, Winton had his first success: the first transport of children left Prague for Britain by airplane. Winton managed to organize seven more transports that departed from Prague’s Wilson Railway Station. The groups then crossed the English Channel by boat and finally ended their journey at London’s Liverpool Street station. At the station, British foster parents waited to collect their charges. Winton, who organized their rescue was set on matching the right child to the right foster parents.

The last trainload of children left on August 2, 1939, bringing the total of rescued children to 669. It is impossible to imagine the emotions of parents sending their children to safety. Knowing they may never be reunited. Impossible to imagine the fears of the children leaving the lives they knew and their loved ones for the unknown.

On September 1, 1939 the biggest transport of children was to take place. On that day Hitler invaded Poland, and all borders controlled by Germany were closed. This put an end to Winton’s rescue efforts. Winton has said many times that the vision that haunts him most to this day is the picture of hundreds of children waiting eagerly at Wilson Station in Prague for that last aborted transport.

Significance of Winton

The significance of Winton’s mission is verified by the fate of that last trainload of children. Moreover, most of the parents and siblings of the children Winton saved perished in the Holocaust.

After the war, Nicholas Winton didn’t tell anyone, not even his wife Grete about his wartime rescue efforts. In 1988, a half century later, Grete found a scrapbook from 1939 in their attic. With all the children’s photos, a complete list of names, a few letters from parents of the children to Winton and other documents, she finally learned the whole story. Scrapbooks and other papers are held at YadVashem, the Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Authority in Israel.

How the story was shared?

Grete shared the story with Dr. Elisabeth Maxwell, a Holocaust historian and the wife of newspaper magnate Robert Maxwell. Robert Maxwell arranged for his newspaper to publish articles on Winton’s amazing deeds. Winton’s extraordinary story led to his appearance on Esther Rantzen’s BBC television program, That’s Life. In the studio, emotions ran high when Winton’s “children”. Introduced themselves and expressed their gratitude to him for saving their lives. Program were aired nationwide, many of the rescued children wrote to him and thanked him. Letters came from all over the world, and new faces still appear at his door. Introducing themselves by names that match the documents from 1939.

The rescued children, many now grandparents, still refer to themselves as “Winton’s children”. Among those saved are the British film director Karel Reisz (The French Lieutenant’s Woman, Isadora, and Sweet Dreams), Canadian journalist and news correspondent for CBC. Joe Schlesinger (originally from Slovakia) Lord Alfred Dubs (a former Minister in the Blair Cabinet). Lady Milena Grenfell-Baines (a patron of the arts whose father, Rudolf Fleischmann, saved Thomas Mann from the Nazis). Dagmar Símová (a cousin of the former U.S. Secretary of State, Madeleine Albright) Tom Schrecker, (a Reader’s Digest manager). Hugo Marom (a famous aviation consultant, and one of the founders of the Israeli Air Force), and Vera Gissing (author of Pearls of Childhood) and coauthor of Nicholas Winton and the Rescued Generation.

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Winton,

http://www.nicholaswinton.com/

About the author

Arvind Tiwari

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